Weekly DVD Alert Seventeen: March 30-April 5, 2010


Picture is unrelated, but we all love ASPHALT JUNGLE-era Marilyn Monroe, right?

Check your local listings, etc. Yeah, I'm a little late this week; it was …. quite a weekend.


Tuesday, March 30


4:10AM-6:05AM, Indie: NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, 113m.
It's strange how this movie … well, it rarely pops up at all in conversations, but I was going to say that it's strange that it rarely pops up in discussions of artistically successful film adaptations of novels. There's really nothing you could add or subtract from it to improve it, is there? The sets are the right kind of squalid futurism, the script doesn't whitewash the more horrifying ideas in Orwell's book and the casting couldn't be better -- John Hurt was the perfect choice for Winston Smith; Richard Burton made an ideal O'Brien and Suzanna Hamilton's Julia is the right mix of heartless and sensual. Michael Radford, we salute you. [Reairs at 3:20PM.]

6AM-7:15AM, TCM: BLUEBEARD, 70m.
An Edgar G. Ulmer period-piece oddball about a puppeteer who just can't keep [from killing] a female assistant. John Carradine, Jean Parker and Nils Asther star.

6:40AM-8:30AM, Sun: THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD, 100m.
Guy Maddin's best. Mark McKinney is a great leading man. [Reairs at 2:15PM.]

8:30AM-11:15AM, FMC: THE BLUE MAX, 156m.
World War I aviation epic. It's very very long, but good watching on a slow Sunday morning.

4PM-6PM, FMC: THE CRAZY WORLD OF JULIUS VROODER, 98m.
6PM-8PM, FMC: TRIBES, 90m.
Potentially interesting double-feature of '70s Vietnam non-war movies.
VROODER stars Timothy Bottoms as a vet who "fakes insanity to escape the world." Costars Barbara Hershey, George Marshall and Richard Dysart under Arthur Hiller's direction in a Hugh Hefner [!?] production. TRIBES sounds awesome: despite it being a TV movie, a prime Darren McGavin plays a tough drill sergeant faced with breaking down a rebellious hippie draftee in a young Jan-Michael Vincent. AIRWOLF! Joseph Sargent directs.

8PM-10:30PM, TCM: DERSU UZALA, 141m.
10:30PM-1:30AM, TCM: KAGEMUSHA, 180m.
I've complained about Turner's habit of airing the lesser-known, more challenging Akira Kurosawa films in the early hours of the morning [usually after my crappy Time Warner Cable service has once again futzed out, rebooted and turned itself off, leaving nice black silence on my DVDr] but I take all of it back for them airing these two in prime time! Even for Kurosawa, UZALA [his first movie following a suicide attempt and a separation from his longtime studio Toho] is an Everest of a movie to tackle just after dinner. Maksim Munzuk, Yuri Solomin and Svetlana Danilchenko star. KAGEMUSHA is a much more conventional 1980 samurai epic, starring Tatsuya Nakadai, Tsutomu Yamazaki and Kenichi Hagiwara.


Wednesday, March 31


1:45AM-4:30AM, TCM: RAN, 163m.
And Kurosawa's 100th birthday celebration concludes with his last period epic, his version of KING LEAR. Tatsuya Nakadai, Akira Terao and Jinpachi Nezu star.

4:30AM-7AM, TCM: KING LEAR, 138m.
Very clever -- follow up Kurosawa's take on Shakespeare's foolish patriarch with an English version of the play. Paul Scofield, Irene Worth and Ian Hogg star under Peter Brook's direction.

6AM-8AM, FMC: DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, 104m.
John Ford's first color film, and his most gorgeous. Henry Fonda! Claudette Colbert! The Revolutionary War in Glorious Technicolor!

7:30AM-10:15AM, Sun: THE YACOUBIAN BUILDING, 165m.
A recent Egyptian metaphorical epic about the inhabitants of a run-down Cairo apartment building. [Reairs at 2PM.]

8AM-10AM, H: NAZI AMERICA: A SECRET HISTORY
Gotta love any time the History Channel gets back to its Nazi-documenting roots. [Reairs at 2PM.]

8AM-9:35AM, FMC: FIXED BAYONETS, 92m.
One of Samuel Fuller's lesser-known war movies, this Korean War cheapie [made during the war] stars Richard Basehart, Michael O'Shea and Gene Evans as [not that] Sgt. Rock.

11AM-1PM, TCM: TWO RODE TOGETHER, 109m.
Even for a very late-model John Ford, the combination of James Stewart and Richard Widmark in a Western must be interesting. Shirley Jones co-stars.

Noon-2PM, Sun: LET'S GET LOST, 120m.
Everyone should see Bruce Weber's iconic profile of cool-jazz trumpeter/singer Chet Baker at least once; Sundance has scheduled it to air often enough this month that everyone will.

8PM-9:30PM, Sun: THE SQUID AND THE WHALE, 81m.
It's wonderful to have Noah Baumbach back and making movies again, although I'm not wild about the stylistic tics he's apparently picked up from working with Wes Anderson; I never thought I'd come to dislike hearing Blossom Dearie but here I am. Jesse Eisenberg, Owen Kline, Jeff Daniels and Laura Linney star. [Reairs at 2:30AM.]


Thursday, April 1


4:15PM-5:45PM, TCM: THREE WISE FOOLS, 90m.
5:46PM-5:57PM, TCM Short: LITTLE WHITE LIE, 11m.
I'm a sucker for a little Margaret O'Brien vehicle, especially one that promises a "crusty" performance from Lionel Barrymore. Edward Buzzell directs.

7AM-9AM, FMC: THE SHERIFF OF FRACTURED JAW, 103m.
A late model, uncharacteristic Raoul Walsh Western, starring Kenneth More, Jayne Mansfield and Connie Francis as Mansfield's singing voice for one of those insipid but undeniably memorable theme songs that you normally have to hire Rod McKuen to write.

2:30PM-4PM, FMC: SILENT MOVIE, 87m.
Mel Brooks assembles his crew -- Marty Feldman, Dom DeLuise, Sid Caesar, Ron Carey and Bernadette Peters this time -- and gives silent cinema the business.

7:49PM-8PM, TCM Short: THE CAMERA CAUGHT IT, 9m.
8PM-10PM, TCM: ADAM'S RIB, 101m.
10PM-12:15AM, TCM: MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON, 130m.
One of Spencer Tracy & Katharine Hepburn's best movies as a team. Judy Holliday, Tom Ewell and Jean Hagen costar and George Cukor directs from a script by married couple Ruth Gordon & Garson Kanin. Then Frank Capra's still-trenchant critique of the media and politics disguised as another Capra-corn yokel-in-the-big-city comedy. James Stewart, Jean Arthur and Claude Rains star.


Friday, April 2


4:15 AM-6AM, TCM: THE MEN WHO MADE THE MOVIES, THE: HOWARD HAWKS, 55m.
Richard Schickel's 1973 portrait of the Hollywood professional's professional.

6AM-7:45AM, TCM: BROADWAY MELODY OF 1936, 101m.
I'm always interested to see more of Jack Benny's movies -- he made a lot more of them than any of us probably assume -- and why he just couldn't translate his radio style to film. With a title like this, you can pretty accurately guess what it's about. Robert Taylor and Eleanor Powell co-star with direction by Roy Del Ruth.

8AM-10AM, FMC: HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON, 108m.
John Huston and Robert Mitchum team up for a WWII yarn about a Marine and a Roman Catholic nun [Deborah Kerr] being marooned on an island in the South Pacific. John Boorman later remade this elliptical romance as HELL IN THE PACIFIC with Lee Marvin and Toshiro Mifune, which I'm going to keep claiming until either someone calls me on it or it gets added to both films' Wikipedia entries.

8:30AM-10:15AM, Sun: DIARY OF A CHAMBERMAID
Jeanne Moreau and Luis Bunuel's take on the original Jean Renoir film. [Reairs at 1:45PM.]

10PM-Midnight, H: WASHINGTON THE WARRIOR
Washington, Washing-ton, Six-foot-five, weighed a fucking ton, etc. Military history of General Washington. [Reairs at 2:01AM.]


Saturday, April 3


6AM-7:15AM, TCM: THE SECRET LAND, 71m.
A 1948 documentary recounting Admiral Richard Byrd's adventures in the Antarctic and its pole. Narrated by Van Heflin, Robert Montgomery and Robert Taylor. [One of these things is not like the other ….]

6:15AM-8:15AM, Sun: NIGHTS OF CABIRIA, 118m.
It's startling and enchanting how late-period Chaplinesque this this early Fellini film is; the film even looks like a sound-era Chaplin in its grain. Giulietta Masina stars, with Amadeo Nazzari. [Reairs at 3PM.]

8:15AM-10:15AM, Sun: JUMP TOMORROW, 97m.
I'm a sucker for multi-national, indie romantic comedies set in upstate New York, especially when they are occasionally funny and have a leading lady like Natalia Verbeke with support from character actors like Hippolyte Girardot and the old man who plays the deaf grandfather. [Reairs at 4PM.]

2PM-3:30PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1985: Livingstone Bramble vs. Ray Mancini"
3:30PM-4:30PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1994 & 1997: Lennox Lewis vs. Oliver McCall I & II"
4:30PM-6PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1993: Riddick Bowe vs. Evander Holyfield II"
6PM-7PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1983: Alexis Arguello vs. Aaron Pryor"
7PM-8PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1991: Evander Holyfield vs. George Foreman"
8PM-8:30PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "2007: Rafael Marquez vs. Israel Vazquez I"
8:30PM-9:30PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1990: Mike Tyson vs. James “Buster” Douglas
9:30PM-11PM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "1975: Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier"
A massive block of mostly classic fights. Too lazy to look up which Arguello-Pryor fight this one is, but both were exciting. Plus, they're showing "The Thrilla In Manilla" instead of "The Rumble In the Jungle" for a change, which is nice. The Rumble is a classic, but it doesn't need to be aired a few times a week for months.

8PM-10PM, TCM: BONNIE AND CLYDE, 111m.
10PM-11:45PM, TCM: POINT BLANK, 92m.
11:45PM-1:30AM, TCM: THE FRIENDS OF EDDIE COYLE, 102m.
I've never seen BONNIE; something about it has offended me for whatever deranged reason, but I like this triple-feature and Roger Ebert told me it's a movie I should watch and I'm not one to argue with him these days. Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway star, duh, and Arthur Penn directs. Lee Marvin & John Boorman's BLANK is one of my favorite movies; I still hold that you can gauge a film's quality to the atomic level based entirely by the fight scenes with Angie Dickinson it contains. COYLE is a wonderful, low-key and genuinely gritty drama from Peter Yates and a startling showcase of how truly great an actor Robert Mitchum could be when he gave a damn. Peter Boyle and Richard Jordan co-star.


Sunday, April 4


6:35AM-8:30AM, IFC: THE FLORENTINE, 104m.
I'm oddly nostalgic for this kind of '90s B+ list cast indie movies, but loathe the entire subgenre of indie gangster movies. This one subverts the formula just enough to make me want to watch all of it -- yes, it features Luke Perry, Jim Belushi, Burt Young and the late Chris Penn in support roles, but what I've seen of the movie was more about accepting that you've grown up [Tom Sizemore's character returns to town to find out his ex-girlfriend Virginia Madsen is getting married] than any gangster shit. Also, how often do we get a chance to realize that the character actor in Hollywood is not entirely dead? [Reairs at 3:15PM.]

11AM-12:15PM, Sun: GUMBY DHARMA, 72m.
Short profile of stop-motion animator Art Clokey, who's not the kind of man you would guess he is based on his Gumby and Davey & Goliath cartoons. It was a terrible idea to have Gumby narrate, especially in the more sordid middle half of Clokey's life. Imagine Charlie Brown narrating the chapters of that Charles Schulz bio that openly discuss how Schulz started to bird dog as his first marriage fell apart. Ew?

Noon-2:30PM, TCM: BARABBAS, 138m.
This is probably one of the less-heralded widescreen Biblical epics for good reason, but I just have to see how Richard Fleischer [of both THE NARROW MARGIN and FANTASTIC VOYAGE] handles the genre and its demands. Anthony Quinn, Jack Palance and Ernest Borgnine star.

2PM-3:45PM FMC: THE GIRL CAN'T HELP IT, 99m.
Frank Tashlin brings his animated-cartoon chops to live-action film. Lurid full-color in Cinemascope, and performances from Fats Domino, Eddie Cochran, Little Richard, Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps and The Platters. Also, Jayne Mansfield's tits. There's an entire universe of a life lived in Tashlin's comment, "There's nothing in the world to me that's funnier than big breasts." Tom Ewell and Edmond O'Brien co-star.

1PM-3PM, H: BANNED FROM THE BIBLE
3PM-5PM, H: BANNED FROM THE BIBLE II
In general, the History Channel's flirtations with Christianity make me nauseous because so much of it is conjecture and end-of-times scaremongering -- they might as well make teasers like the 11 O'Clock News "The Gospel of John -- what you DON'T KNOW just might KILL YOU AND YOUR FAMILY!!! Tonight, at 8PM." -- but these two programs sound promising. A look at the Books dropped from the Bible over the years -- Enoch, Mary, Jubilees, Judas, etc. -- though I trust the producers won't actually make explicit that these revisions to God's Literal, Unquestionable Word show that the Bible is just a book. A poorly edited, incredibly uneven anthology best shelved in the "fantasy" section, if you want to be specific. Happy Easter, by the way.

2:30PM-5PM, TCM: THE SILVER CHALICE, 135m.
Another widescreen Bible extravaganza, but this one has the unearthly Pier Angeli. Sold! Also: Paul Newman, Virginia Mayo and direction from Victor Saville.

5PM-8PM, TCM: THE KING OF KINGS, 171m.
Holy Fucking Shit, it's Nick Fucking Ray's "The Life of Christ" starring Jeffrey Hunter [!!!] as Jesus, the very Oy-rish Siobhan McKenna as his mom Mary, Robert Ryan as John The Baptist and a young Rip Torn as Judas [!!!], with narration written by Ray Bradbury [!] and delivered by Orson Welles. And Nick Ray pulls it off. Really, WTF FTW people.

10:30PM-1:45AM, TCM: THE NUN'S STORY, 152m.
Considering how adorable she was, it's easy to overlook how good an actress Audrey Hepburn was. Nun movies were a staple of the Hollywood studio era, yet only a handful of them remain with us as vividly as when they were released. I don't know if this is a great movie, or even a good one, but it stays with you for a while. Peter Finch and Edith Evans co-star under Fred Zinnemann's direction.


Monday, April 5


1:45AM-3:15AM, TCM: THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC, 82m.
3:15AM-5:40AM, TCM: JULIET OF THE SPIRITS, 137m.
TCM closes out Easter Sunday with a top Silent Sunday and TCM Import. ARC is a startling, haunting Carl Theodor Dreyer film about the iconic femme flammable, starring Renee Falconetti, Eugene Silvain and Antonin Artaud. SPIRITS is an iconoclastic view of life and spirituality from Federico Fellini. Giulietta Masina, Sandra Milo and Valentina Coretese star.

7:20AM-9:15, IFC: THE FIELD, 113m.
I'm pretty sure a movie can't get more Irish than this unless someone in Craft Services dies from a potato famine. Richard Harris faces off against Tom Berenger over ownership of a gawd-forsaken patch of rocky farmland. John Hurt provides support as the village idiot.

12:15PM-1:50PM, TCM: FURY, 93m.
I believe this was Fritz Lang's first film in America, and it's a brutal meditation on mob rule, the rule of law and revenge. Also, don't piss Spencer Tracy off.

12:15PM-2PM, IFC: SOLARIS, 99m.
Steven Soderbergh delights and awes again, remaking Stanislaw Lem's thoughtful science-fiction novel and/or Andrei Tarkovsky's 1972 mindfuck into a soulful little $60,000,000 movie about memory and regret. If Jeremy Davies' jittery style has ever been better deployed, I'd love to know where. [Reairs at 5:15PM.]

4PM-6PM, TCM: NOBODY LIVES FOREVER, 100m.
A nice post-war thriller from workhorse Jean Negulesco; John Garfield and Geraldine Fitzgerald should have made more movies together.

6PM-7:30PM, TCM: BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK, 82m.
What I said here. Spencer Tracy, Robert Ryan and Anne Francis star, John Sturges directs.

8PM-11:30PM, TCM: GIANT, 201m.
11:30PM-1:30AM, TCM: GEORGE STEVENS: A FILMMAKER'S JOURNEY, 112m.
George Stevens' "modern" epic about one Texas ranching family is best known as one of James Dean's only films. I've seen the movie twice and for the life of me I barely remember him and co-star Elizabeth Taylor at all -- all I take away from my viewings is the scene where Rock Hudson fights an assholic roadside-diner cook for calling his grandson [I think?] a "beaner." I don't know if that reflects badly on the movie or me. STEVENS is a lengthy mid-'80s profile of the filmmaker, leading into a mini-marathon of his films in the wee small hours of the morning.


And there's another week.

The 2107th step on the last road home.

Little Man, fashion plate

With just a newspaper's protective plastic bag -- one of Little's favorite non-toy toys -- and a little pizzaz, we have a jaunty ascot, charming bow tie and a riding blanket fit for even the most handsome French-vanilla Palomino.

Hospital bathroom, yesterday

Why would a hospital hang a sign about its ID requirements on the wall of a unisex restroom?

The 2104th step on the last road home.

Insert joke about the horse in THE GODFATHER here

The squeamish might want to skip the following photos, despite their bluriness.

Little Man has killed again -- I got up this morning to find the other two cats freaking out in the kitchen over a dead mouse. Well, more accurately: Over a dead mouse's head, because that's all that was left of it. Littles was out in the front window, relaxing and grooming himself in the sunshine.

The other cats were also hungry for breakfast, which didn't interest Littles at all for a change. I hope none of these mice carry any diseases that Little Man could catch from eating them. If that's really what he does if we don't get a chance to take the corpse away from him, then we must add the pair of mystery kills from last year -- where all that remained where the mice's bloodied faces -- to Little Man's total kill count. Sometimes, it's like I don't know my cat at all.

The 2103rd step on the last road home.

Interesting Science Wednesday

Little-known fact: Of all of the millions of species on this Earth, only male Silverback Gorillas are able to finish masturbating after a non-mate unwittingly walks in on them en onania res.

An even lesser-known fact: The Silverbacks are also unique in that they will hold and maintain eye contact while spanking it. I know this because I interrupted a Silverback's Me time once when I stumbled into an alpha male named Eddie when I worked as a gorilla-house techie at a zoo.

It was the most intimidating moment in my life; not because he was twice my size and could easily tear me to pieces in a rage -- he was, and we both knew it -- but because it's humbling to receive prolonged eye contact from anyone who's masturbating when you know that you're not-at-all what's on the diddler's mind even as he jerks away and stares at you.

As intimidation ploys go, "masturbation with expressionless staring" has to be the nuclear option -- the kind of thought that should only be accessible from a "football" containing NORAD codes, and maybe a Dead Man's Trigger too.

(sent from the phone)

Littles, contrappasto

When did my cat develop udders?

Definitely more than 140 characters, probably less than two cents.

The United States is so ethnically/culturally rich and diverse that it even contains and hosts entire nationwide cultures of xenophobic morons who literally never see anyone from outside their tribe at all, except for caricatures on television and sometimes the backs of heads while standing in line at stores. If only these social enclaves viewed The Other with apathy, not fear and anger. (message sent from the phone)

The 2101st step on the last road home.

Weekly DVD Alert Sixteen: March 22-March 29, 2010


Photo by Weegee. Click for slightly larger.

As always, check your local listings.


Monday, March 22


11:30AM-1:30PM, TCM: ALL FALL DOWN, 110m.
1:30PM-4PM, TCM: BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ, 149m.
A pair of 1962-released films from John Frankenheimer; DOWN is a romance starring young Warren Beatty, Eva Marie Saint and Angela Lansbury. BIRDMAN is the Robert Stroud biopic that starred Burt Lancaster, with Telly Savalas and Thelma Ritter.

4PM-6PM TCM: THE CINCINNATI KID,103m.
A poker version of THE HUSTLER, only Steve McQueen and Edward G. Robinson try to steal scenes by underacting. Ann-Margret co-stars, Norman Jewison directs.

4:45PM-5PM, Sun: NEW BOY, 11m.
A short film from Steph Green and Roddy Doyle about a 9-year-old African boy's first day at an Irish school. [Reairs on March 28 at 5:35PM.]

6PM-8PM, TCM: MURDERERS' ROW, 105m.
The human race lost untold riches and glory when it somehow reached 1970 without a Matt Helm-Derek Flint team-up movie; if memory serves, the closest Dean Martin and James Coburn ever came to sharing the screen together was maybe a Western or a TV roast. This slice of Helm cheese co-stars Ann-Margret and Karl Malden, under the direction of Henry Levin.

8PM-9:30PM, IFC: MONTY PYTHON LIVE AT THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL, 77m.
Concert film of the Pythons' last [I presume] live performance with the full troupe: Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, with Carol Cleveland and Neil Inness. A last hurrah before Chapman had to be an asshole and die on them. [Reairs at 3AM.]

8PM-10PM TCM: THE BIG SLEEP, 114m.
10PM-11:45PM, TCM: THE MALTESE FALCON, 101m.
Sometimes schedule programming this lazy deeply offends me.

11PM-12:20AM, Sun: A WALK INTO THE SEA: DANNY WILLIAMS AND THE WARHOL FACTORY, 77m.
Whatever happened to Danny Williams? Well, first: Who is Danny Williams? He was a key member of the filmmaking section of Andy Warhol's factory, who reportedly "edited some of Warhol's films and created the revolutionary lighting design for a notable stage show. Additionally, Williams was also Warhol's sometime lover." Williams' niece Esther B. Robinson made this documentary to investigate her uncle's life, work and 1966 disappearance. [Reairs at 4:50AM and 12:15PM.]


Tuesday, March 23


Midnight-2AM, TCM: THE SHOOTIST, 99m.
2AM-4AM, TCM: STAGECOACH, 96m.
4AM-6AM, TCM: DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD, 110m.
A triple feature of Monument Valley manliness. First, John Wayne's swan song as an actor, in a Don Siegel Western that most illustrates how permeable the line between "lean, taught" and "cheap" filmmaking can be. Lauren Bacall, Ron Howard and James Stewart co-star. Then, the Duke's breakout turn as the Ringo Kid in John Ford's first Western talkie, an eternal film-school textbook; Claire Trevor, George Bancroft and Monument Valley co-star. Finally, director/autuer hero-worshipper Peter Bogdanovich has updated and revised his 1971 profile of the irascible Ford; Orson Welles narrates.

12:15AM-1:30AM, HBO: BOXING: "Manny Pacquiao vs. Joshua Clottey"
Apparently, this welterweight bill of goods made its non-PPV debut over the weekend; HBO didn't even promote the rebroadcast! Frankly, despite the massive stage and Pac's best efforts to make it an entertaining fight -- his round-ending two-fisted jab will be the only thing to live on in highlight reels -- this is the sort of boxing match that should only be aired in the wee small hours of the morning. Y'know, when even boxing fanatics are trying to go to sleep.

12:30AM-2:30AM, Sun: AMAZING JOURNEY: SIX QUICK ONES, 117m.
Six not-so-short films about The Who from Nick Doob, Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker and Parris Patton: individual biographies of Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend, an essay about the Mods and their art scene and a recent look at the band's 2003 recording sessions. [Reairs on the 29th at 9:30PM and on the 30th at 2:50AM and 10:50AM.]

1:15AM-2:45AM, FMC: SILENT MOVIE, 87m.
Mel Brooks assembles his crew -- Marty Feldman, Dom DeLuise, Sid Caesar, Ron Carey and Bernadette Peters this time -- and gives silent cinema the business. [Reairs at 4:30AM.]

6AM-7:30AM, TCM: SANSHIRO SUGATA, 79m.
It's Akira Kurosawa's 100th birthday today and TCM celebrates by showing his films all day -- in chronological order, no less -- leading off with his first film as a full-fledged director. It's startling to see so much of the artist's prime sensibilities already formed and so many of the thematic and textural concerns he would explore over and over the next 50 years. Susumu Fujita, Ryunosuke Tsukigata and Akitake Kono star.

6:15AM-9AM, Sun: THE YACOUBIAN BUILDING, 165m.
A recent Egyptian metaphorical epic about the inhabitants of a run-down Cairo apartment building. [Reairs at 1:35PM and on the 31st at 7:30AM and 2PM.]

7:30AM-9AM, TCM: THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, 85m.
I'm thrilled that one of A.K.'s thoughtful dramas isn't airing at 3:15AM for a change: Kurosawa's second feature film is a WWII homefront ensemble piece that, if my memory serves, doesn't quite transcend its propaganda origins but does a better job of it than, say, SINCE YOU WENT AWAY. Takashi Shimura, Shoji Kiyokawa and Ichiro Sugai star.

8AM-1PM, H: WWII IN HD "Darkness Falls," "Hard Way Back," "Bloody Resolve," "Battle Stations," "Day of Days"
The first five episodes of the History Channel's fairly slick CGI repackaging of The War, going from its start to the initial aftermath of the Normandy invasion. [Reairs at 2PM.]

8:30AM-10AM, IFC: BROADWAY DANNY ROSE, 86m.
A funny mid-career Woody Allen movie. [Reairs at 1:30PM.]

9AM-10:45AM, Sun: THE HOME SONG STORIES, 103m.
Tony Ayres wrote and directed this semi-autobiographical, appropriately meandering movie about his desperately materialistic single-mother [Joan Chen], his sister and their ever-shifting home life. I still haven't actually Googled it yet to confirm, but the idea that Joan Chen's not only a protege of Chairman Mao's wife, but may also still be pro-Cultural Revolution even now has made her much less bonerific in my eyes. Eye. Whether that's true or not, my penis and its two closest advisers in the Gang of Three have already denounced me for being Counter-Revolutionary. Still, Chen is compelling in this film, letting the viewer in on everything she's feeling except, in key points, whatever the thoughts are every mother clearly hides from her children. [Reairs at 4:20PM.]

9AM-10:30, FMC: DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK, 76m.
A snappy, noirish programmer starring a young Richard Widmark, a young Marilyn Monroe and a very young Anne Bancroft in her feature-film debut. Daniel Taradash wrote the screenplay for director Roy Ward Baker. It's not Billy Wilder, but the dialogue fairly crackles throughout. "I'm not angry; I'm just furious."

9AM-10AM, TCM: THE MEN WHO TREAD ON THE TIGER'S TAIL, 59m.
Kurosawa's extremely short, rather ballsy fable about Japan's sad state of affairs as the War ended was made in 1945 but banned until 1952, for reasons that will be understandable if not condonable. Kenjiro Okochi, Susumu Fujita and Kenichi Enomoto star.

10AM-11:30AM, TCM: SANSHIRO SUGATA PART II, 82m.
Sugata returns to kick some Yanki ass and chew bubble gum, but the Yanks have atomic-bombed all the bubble gum, etc. Denjiro Okochi, Susumu Fujita and Ryunosuke Tsukigata return as stars.

10:30AM-Noon, FMC: AS YOUNG AS YOU FEEL, 77m.
Small-budget comedy about an old man fighting back against his company forcing him to retire. Monty Woolley is the [old] man, with support from Jean Peters, Thelma Ritter, David Wayne and a young Marilyn Monroe and direction from Harmon Jones from old Lamar Trotti's adaptation of young Paddy Chayefsky's story.

11:30AM-1:30PM, TCM: NO REGRETS FOR OUR YOUTH, 110m.
Kurosawa plays neorealism in a coming-of-age drama about a young woman struggling to live her life in WWII Kyoto. Setsuko Hara stars with Danjiro Oicochi and Eiko Miyoshi.

1:30PM-3:30PM, TCM: ONE WONDERFUL SUNDAY, 110m.
Jean Renoir could only wish he made a movie this sweet and simple; SUNDAY regularly jockeys for position as my favorite Kurosawa against DODESUKADEN, HIGH AND LOW and THRONE OF BLOOD -- perhaps it's not as immaculately executed as the latter, later movies, but it's heartfelt in a way that rarely reaches the screen. Midori Ariyama and Chieko Nakakita star as a poor, engaged couple determined to spend a wonderful Sunday together despite only having 35 Yen available to spend.

3:30PM-5:30PM, TCM: THE DRUNKEN ANGEL, 98m.
5:30PM-8PM, TCM: STRAY DOG, 122m.
Takashi Shimura essentially passed the Kurosawa-leading-man baton on to the fiery Toshiro Mifune over the course of making this back-to-back pair of Noirs.

8PM-9:30PM, TCM: RASHOMON, 88m.
9:30PM-1AM, TCM: THE SEVEN SAMURAI, 207m.
It's international Star Time for Kurosawa; first, the hugely influential subjective-view drama about the rape and murder of a married couple, starring Mifune, Machiko Kyo and Masayuki Mori, with Takashi Shimura. Then, the remarkably subtle epic about a small group of ronin hired to protect a small village from an impending raid from bandits, starring Mifune, Takashi Shimura, Kuninori Kodo, Seiji Miyaguchi, Daisuke Kato, Isao Kimura and Yoshio Inaba star.

9PM-11PM, H: SNIPER: INSIDE THE CROSSHAIRS
I love sniper stories. This History documentary recounts/reenacts a number of famous shots and discusses technique and other terribly interesting, ultimately useless things to know. [Reairs at 1:01AM.]


Wednesday, March 24


12:20AM-5:15AM, Indie: DAS BOOT, 293m.
This is the full miniseries version of the film, not the abridged theatrical cut. Often, extended cuts add nothing of value to a movie -- in some cases, the extra material can actually take away from the whole [see THE 40 YEAR OLD VIRGIN] -- but sometimes the additional footage simply allows you to enjoy the pleasure of its company a little longer. Which is an odd thing to say about a movie this stress-inducing, but I've enjoyed being stuck inside that tiny sub even longer than before, although I can barely watch more than two hours straight before needing air and space.

1AM-3AM, TCM: YOJIMBO, 111m.
3AM-4:45AM, TCM: SANJURO, 95m.
Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune's early '60s pair of classic sword & social-commentary adventures, driven by a Dashiell Hammett-inspired antihero. Tatsuya Nakadai co-stars as one of the ickiest heavies in Kurosawa's oeuvre, with support from Eijiro Tono and Seizaburo Kawazu in the first film and Tatsuya Hakadai and Yuzo Kayama in the second.

4:45AM-7:15AM, TCM: DODES 'KA-DEN, 140m.
If nothing else, Kurosawa makes the absolute most of the palette that color film offered at the time in his first color movie. This film comes off as terribly aloof and disjointed until/unless you watch it not as an ensemble story but as a portrait of a neighborhood. Yoshitaka Zushi leads a cast that includes Kin Sugai and Kaou Kato. Again, I understand why schedule programmers bury these kinds of challenging, offbeat films in the wee small hours of the morning, but that doesn't mean it's not chickenshit of them.

5:15AM-6:45AM, Indie: GAS!, 78m.
Roger Corman's last movie as a director for American International. Even when he made shit -- "nerve gas kills everyone older than 25 in a Texas town, so the survivors travel to a New Mexico hippie commune" -- there's something about Corman that I find compelling. This one probably will be aired in Pan & Scan, but it's not a movie that gets a lot of play anyway.

7:45AM-9:15AM, TCM: THE BLOB, 82m.
On what would have been Steve McQueen's 80th birthday, Turner spends the day showing some of his best and/or most popular movies. The celebration begins with one of McQueen's debut as a teenager who struggles to warn his small town of an ever-growing malignant monster from outer space. Aneta Corseaut and Earl Rowe co-star under direction by Irvin S. Yeaworth, Jr. from a script by Kay Linaker and Theodore Simonson.

8AM-1PM, H: WWII IN HD "Point of No Return" "Striking Distance" "Glory and Guts" "Edge of the Abyss" "End Game"
The last five episodes of the History Channel's fairly slick CGI repackaging of The War, going from the Allies' post-Normandy push toward Berlin to Japan's surrender. [Reairs at 2PM.]

9:15AM-11:30AM, NEVER SO FEW, 125m.
This is not a good movie. The worst thing that ever happened to Frank Sinatra was getting an Oscar for his work on FROM HERE TO ETERNITY; he was never Olivier, but after he made it back on top he could barely put in enough effort to play himself convincingly -- and this is almost 100% a Frank Sinatra movie. I just include it here because it's hysterical that Frank replaced Sammy Davis Jr. with Steve McQueen -- not out of any historical accuracy, but because Sam dared to criticize The Leader in a radio interview -- for this frankly stupid WWII yarn about OSS agents fighting alongside Burmese guerillas. Gina Lollobrigida co-stars, with support from Peter Lawford, Charles Bronson, Paul Henreid and Brian Donlevy under John Sturges' nominal direction.

11:30AM-1:45PM, TCM: NEVADA SMITH, 131m.
I always get this one confused with THE CINCINNATI KID. This is the Henry Hathaway-helmed Western that stars McQueen as that most vomitorious of Hollywood character types, the "fiery half-breed." Karl Malden and Brian Keith co-star.

11:35AM-2:45PM, IFC: FANNY & ALEXANDER, 188m.
I apparently don't give Ingmar Bergman his props. Fine. Ingmar Bergman rules the schools, date-rapes the mules and pities the fools. There.

1:45PM-3:45PM, TCM: THE REIVERS, 111m.
McQueen's entry in my second- or third-favorite film sub-genre, the my-nonconformist-uncle section of coming-of-age movies. Based on William Faulkner's final novel -- the plot sounds like it was taken from Faulkner fanfic, the writing "lighter" than his usual tone; so curious how often dying artists try to put on a happy face so close to death [see also: Bill Hicks' Cosby sweaters the last few months of his life] -- written by another husband & wife writing team, Harriet Frank Jr. and Irving Ravetch and directed by Mark Rydell.

3:45PM-5:45PM, TCM: LE MANS, 109m.
Straight-up car pornography. Roaring engines, incredible speed, vehicles having more character than the men driving them -- yeah, this is the Steve McQueen racing movie, not the James Garner one.

5:45PM-7:30PM, TCM: JUNIOR BONNER, 100m.
Sam Peckinpah engages the meaning of the death of the Old West in yet another way, this time as a very small family drama built around McQueen as a washed-up rodeo rider. Robert Preston and Ida Lupino co-star.

6PM-8PM, IFC: THE CROSSING GUARD, 120m.
Sean Penn's sophomore outing as a writer/director stars Jack Nicholson and Anjelica Huston as parents of a child killed by a drunk-driving David Morse. I'm not wild about Penn's Cassavettes pastiches -- Penn seems to see Cassavettes' more unfortunate habits as his most admirable traits -- but I could watch the scene where Nicholson dismissively manhandles Robbie Robertson over and over.

8PM-10PM, FMC: THE COMMITMENTS, 118m.
This adaptation of Roddy Doyle's story about a ragtag bunch of Dublin aspiring musicians assembled to form a classic-soul band is charming and fun, and unique in that it may be the only film adaptation that takes more time to ingest than the original book does. Director Alan Parker and screenwriters Doyle, Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais score major points with me for using "Mustang Sally" as the first song the band tries to play, as it's a tune that can be mauled and defaced enough. Even Buddy Guy, Los Lobos, Albert Collins and the Coasters can't make that song not bite into a wet bag of shit. [Reairs at Midnight and on the 29th at 1:30AM.]

10PM-Midnight, FMC: A PERFECT COUPLE, 110m.
This long-eclipsed '70s Robert Altman movie about a middle-aged Los Angeles man meeting a young torch singer via a dating service can't boast of a cast nor a reputation on par with NASHVILLE's, but it deserves to been mentioned toward the end of the same breath. Paul Dooley and Marta Heflin star, Altman wrote the screenplay, or whatever they used to shoot the movie, with Allan F. Nicholls.

10:30PM-Midnight, Sun: ERASERHEAD, 85m.
David Lynch's debut feature film. It's a classic. I haven't seen it. Chinga tu madre, cineastehole. [Reairs at 5:45AM and on the 29th at 11:50PM.]


Thursday, March 25


12:35AM-2AM, IFC: IT'S ALIVE, 80m.
A small order of 1968 schlock from Larry Buchanan: A demented farmer keeps a cave-nested prehistoric monster as a pet, and feeds it three people, who strenuously object to the situation.

4:15AM-5:50AM, FMC: CLAUDINE, 92m.
John Berry is a fascinating case -- a Mercury Theatre alumnus, blacklisted in the 1950s, etc. -- CLAUDINE may not be a JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN or a SALT OF THE EARTH, but it's a remarkable achievement from a director who strove for something more than genre crowd-pleasing.

6AM-8AM, FMC: THE PROUD ONES, 90 or 94m.
This film often gets compared to RIO BRAVO [although HIGH NOON might be a better fit], but Marshall Robert Ryan has to deal with a revenge-addled Jeffrey Hunter, a socially powerful Robert Middleton and a downright disrespectful populace and there's no calvary coming to bail his ass out in the last reel, so far as I can recall. In BRAVO, Wayne and Howard Hawks act like being able to hold off one gang until help arrives is just on this side of impossible. I always thought it was funny that the plot of Wayne & Hawks' right-wing, Real American response to HIGH NOON hinged on the Duke coercing a drunk and a codger to collectively fight for the good of the community. If John Garfield and Dalton Trumbo had made that movie, you know they would have been executed as Commie traitors on the sidewalk in front of Grauman's Chinese Theatre. Anyway, THE PROUD ONES isn't nearly as heralded as a classic as either of those films, but it has gorgeous Cinemascope cinematography and a great performance from Ryan.

7:15AM-8:15AM, Sun: THE TUNNEL DWELLERS OF NEW YORK, 51m.
Chantal Lasbats travels deep underground the streets of New York City, into its 18 levels of tunnels and 468 subway stations, to learn and tell stories of the homeless Vietnam vets and other societal rejects that still live down there. [Reairs on the 27th at 7:15AM.]

9:20AM-11:45AM, IFC: A FISTFUL OF DYNAMITE, 139m.
Even half-assed, compromised Sergio Leone is worth watching. Sometimes. My head swims at the idea that the lead roles were intended for Jason Robards and Eli Wallach, with Malcolm McDowell in a support role. Instead, we got Rod Steiger, James Coburn and David Warbeck and a Leone who had no interest in directing the film until he was forced into the helm. DUCK, YOU SUCKER is such a great title, too. [Reairs at 3:15PM.]

Noon-1:35PM, IFC: BRUCE LEE: HIS LAST DAYS, HIS LAST NIGHTS, 91m.
This unauthorized-biographical flick is an onion of exploitation; so many layers. Li Hsiu Hsien [later renamed "Danny Lee"] stars as Bruce Lee; Betty Ting Pei co-stars as Lee's lover … Betty Ting Pei. Three years after the real Lee mysteriously died in Pei's apartment. So creepy. The movie has one of the greatest non-starting starts I've ever seen; an interminable fight scene in the middle of nowhere. I believe it was F. Scott Fitzgerald who passionately believed that the first two chapters of a story are written solely for the writer's benefit and should be cut outright before revisions; Scott would probably burst into flames and/or ejaculate after the first half-hour of this movie. [Reairs on the 26th at 5AM.]

2:45PM-4:45PM, TCM: HOBSON'S CHOICE, 108m.
4:45PM-6:45PM, TCM: MADELEINE, 115m.
A double-feature of early '50s David Lean dramas. I know nothing about either, but the idea of Lean directing the mighty Charles Laughton in the former is more than enough to get me to record both. John Mills and Brenda De Banzie co-star in the former, Ann Todd, Norman Wooland and Leslie Banks in the latter.

6PM-8PM, Sun: NIGHTS OF CABIRIA, 118m.
It's startling and enchanting how late-period Chaplinesque this this early Fellini film is; the film even looks like a sound-era Chaplin in its grain. Giulietta Masina stars, with Amadeo Nazzari. [Reairs at 5:15AM and 12:30PM.]

6PM-8:05PM, IFC: DAYS OF GLORY, 120m.
Indie war movie about how North Africans/Arabs/Muslims in French-controlled colonies volunteered to fight Nazis and liberate France despite the kind of discriminatory treatment one normally only imagines black American soldiers received during World War II. Directed by Rachid Bouchareb from a screenplay co-written with Olivier Lorelle.

6:45PM-8PM, TCM: INDISCRETION OF AN AMERICAN WIFE, 63m.
Of late, TCM seems to love showing this movie over and over even more than it loves doing the same with ABBOTT & COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN. Jennifer Jones stars in a very small Vittorio De Sica melodrama as An American Wife Who Is Indiscreet In Italy. Montgomery Clift and Richard Beymer co-star.

8PM-10PM, TCM: INTERIORS, 92m.
It gets harder and harder to keep Woody Allen's films straight in one's mind -- I think this is Allen's first Bergman-on-Long-Island drama. Yippee. Diane Keaton, Geraldine Page and Maureen Stapleton star.

9:30PM-11PM, Sun: THE SQUID AND THE WHALE, 81m.
It's wonderful to have Noah Baumbach back and making movies again, although I'm not wild about the stylistic tics he's apparently picked up from working with Wes Anderson; I never thought I'd come to dislike hearing Blossom Dearie but here I am. Jesse Eisenberg, Owen Kline, Jeff Daniels and Laura Linney star. [Reairs at 2:15AM, on the 31st at 8PM and on April 1 at 2:30AM.]

11:45PM-1:15AM, IFC: BROTHERHOOD OF DEATH, 85m.
There's a very specific look, sound and feel to no-budget mid-'70s action movies that just can't be copied. This is a terrible movie, but watchable if you miss drive-in cinemas. Bill Berry directs a "gripping" "thriller" about three black Vietnam vets coming home to fight the Ku Klux Klan.


Friday, March 26


2AM-4AM, TCM: THE HAPPY ENDING, 112m.
4AM-6AM, TCM: THE PUMPKIN EATER, 110m.
A fine double feature of '60s Ladies Dramas: 1969's ENDING stars Jean Simmons as a middle-aged woman who leaves her family to go, like, find herself, man. John Forsythe and Lloyd Bridges co-star under Richard Brooks's direction. Anne Bancroft almost literally kicks some ass in 1964's EATER, as a young middle-aged woman struggling to find a lasting love over a series of unhappy marriages. Peter Finch and James Mason co-star with direction by Jack Clayton from a script by Harold Pinter.

4:10AM-6:05AM, Indie: NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, 113m.
It's strange how this movie … well, it rarely pops up at all in conversations, but I was going to say that it's strange that it rarely pops up in discussions of artistically successful film adaptations of novels. There's really nothing you could add or subtract from it to improve it, is there? The sets are the right kind of squalid futurism, the script doesn't whitewash the more horrifying ideas in Orwell's book and the casting couldn't be better -- John Hurt was the perfect choice for Winston Smith; Richard Burton made an ideal O'Brien and Suzanna Hamilton's Julia is the right mix of heartless and sensual. Michael Radford, we salute you. [Reairs at 3:30PM, then on the 30th at 4:10AM and 3:20PM.]

8AM-9:30 FMC: TOBACCO ROAD, 84m.
I assume this is one of those less-than-stellar movies John Simon was thinking of with he described John Ford's oeuvre as two or three Edsels to every Ford, but I like the idea that he followed up THE GRAPES OF WRATH with a comedy/drama straight out of Dogpatch. Charley Grapewin, Marjorie Rambeau, Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews star.

9:30AM-Noon, FMC: THE FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX, 142m.
The original movie, not the remake -- although I am interested to see the 2005 version, mostly to see Giovanni Ribisi and Hugh Laurie as well as see how big a shit the writer/director/producers take on Robert Aldrich & Lukas Heller's original song to group effort and rationality in the face of all-consuming hostility. I'm guessing the remakers missed that point and focussed more on shit blowing up but good. James Stewart, Richard Attenborough, Peter Finch, Ernest Borgnine, George Kennedy and Hardy Krueger star.

10AM-11:30AM, TCM: SIDE STREET, 83m.
I don't quite savvy why today is Jean Hagen day on Turner Classic Movies [starts at 6:30AM with AMBUSH], but I'm not complaining: This is a 1950 thriller from Anthony Mann that stars Hagen, Farley Granger and James Craig.

10:30AM-12:30PM, Sun: LET'S GET LOST, 120m.
Everyone should see Bruce Weber's iconic profile of cool-jazz trumpeter/singer Chet Baker at least once; Sundance has scheduled it to air often enough this month that everyone will. [Reairs at 5PM and on the 31st at Noon.]

1PM-2:30PM, TCM: NIGHT INTO MORNING, 86m.
I've often wondered what the story was about Fletcher Markle; I first encountered the Canadian writer/director/producer/actor when his production of "Life With Adam" aired on THE MERCURY SUMMER THEATRE OF THE AIR; Orson Welles seemed quite pleased to hail Markle as his Canadian counterpart [Markle reported was the show's uncredited producer/director], but the few Markle films I've seen were disappointing. I've not seen MORNING, but the combination of Markle, Jean Hagen and Ray Milland is plenty for me to give it a shot.

2:30PM-4:30PM, TCM: THE ASPHALT JUNGLE, 112m.
John Huston's finest and most rewatchable movie. That's right, I said it. Sterling Hayden and Louis Calhern star, with memorable support from Marilyn Monroe in the sweet spot of attractiveness between her rough-cut early years and the empty perfection of her prime. Richard Fleischer could have told this story in half the time, Abraham Polonsky could have told it with twice the style and Robert Aldrich could have wrung twice as much character dynamic out of the performances, but only Huston could make a heist movie breathe [or wheeze]. If not for a few Warner Bros.-esque crutches, this movie is truly evergreen.

4:30PM-6:30PM, TCM: JOHNNY GUITAR, 110m.
Nicholas Ray's cult-classic Ladies Western. Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden and Mercedes McCambridge star.

8PM-10PM, TCM: JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS, 104m.
Is this the funnest adventure movie ever? Um, maybe. Usually any movie labeled "fun for the whole family" is one or the other at best -- usually neither -- but this is the exception to the rule. The skeleton sword fights are the best.

8:45PM-10:30PM, IFC: THE PROPHECY, 96m.
So, HIGHLANDER creator Gregory Widen made his directorial debut with a movie starring Christopher Walken as the angel Gabriel, who plans a bloody coup in Heaven, and Eric Stoltz as the angel Simon, who struggles to thwart Gabriel's plan before anyone gets hurt. In Heaven. Moriah Snyder, Elias Koteas and Virginia Madsen co-star. Viggo Mortensen plays Satan. I will be so disappointed if this movie is good.

10PM-Midnight, TCM: CLASH OF THE TITANS, 118m.
Ray Harryhausen concludes his feature-film career with a bang. I'm much more interested in how they got heavyweights like Laurence Olivier, Maggie Smith, Claire Bloom and Burgess Meredith to star in the original movie than I am in hearing anything about the upcoming remake. Harry Hamlin stars.

10PM-Midnight, ESPN2: FRIDAY NIGHT FIGHTS
Tomasz Adamek moving up to heavyweight makes Steve Cunningham "the man" at Cruiserweight -- Marco Huck may disagree but fuck him, if he wants to be the top dog, he'll have to fight outside of Germany sooner or later -- so him scrapping with the young but already top-ten Matt Godfrey one of the most promising-sounding fights FNF has scheduled in a while. Except that the entire card has imploded, and may not be be aired at all. [Reairs at 2:30AM, if it airs.]


Saturday, March 27


1AM-2AM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "2003: Evander Holyfield vs. James Toney"
2AM-2:30AM, ESPNC: CLASSIC BOXING "2003: Joel Casamayor vs. Diego Corrales"
Nice little double-header of 2003 superfights that ended in middle-round TKOs. [Reairs at 8PM.]

2:15AM-3:45AM, TCM: RACE WITH THE DEVIL, 88m.
1975! Peter Fonda! Warren Oates! Loretta Swit! Lara Parker! Sex! Drugs! Satanic human-sacrifice! Production-treatment of animals guaranteed to still get PETA's panties in a bunch!

5:30AM-6AM, TCM Short: SHAKE HANDS WITH DANGER, 23m.
This 1970 safety-training film scared the hell out of me more than any horror movie made since my childhood. Great theme song, too.

5:45AM-9:45AM, Indie: ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA, 229m.
One of the few four-hour films that can [or should] easily sell you on sitting for the whole thing with just a thumbnail description: "Sergio Leone's GODFATHER, but Jewish." I wonder if the stories that Leone's rough cut was eight to ten hours long are true, and if that footage still exists if it ever did; there's a TV miniseries that would still rake in eyeballs 25 years later. Robert De Niro heads a hugh cast featuring Joe Pesci, Burt Ward [at long last, both greasy sidekicks in the same movie], James Woods, Elizabeth McGovern, Danny Aiello, Tuesday Weld, Treat Williams, William Forsythe, et al. with Jennifer Connelly making her film debut. [Reairs at 3:25PM.]

6AM-7:01AM, FMC: THE BIG TRAIL, 120m.
John Wayne's first starring role, very much like the old OREGON TRAIL video game [see also: UNTAMED; Fox really had a thing for this story]. Raoul Walsh was no John Ford, but neither was John Ford most of the time. Lots of magnificent scenery in this one, appropriately enough.

6:30AM-8:30AM, IFC: BRIGHT YOUNG THINGS, 105m.
Writer/actor/first-time director Stephen Fry adapts Evelyn Waugh's novel VILE BODIES into a fine, witty ensemble period-piece. Stephen Campbell Moore, Emily Mortimer, Peter O'Toole star, Dan Aykroyd, Simon Callow and Stockard Channing cameo. [Reairs at 1:15PM.]

8:15AM-10AM, Sun: METROPOLITAN, 98m.
Whit Stillman's debut as a writer-director, a Wilde-esque comedy of manners and another fine movie that makes you love Christopher Eigeman at the same time you want to punch his character in the mouth. Edward Clements co-stars.

8:30AM-10AM, FMC: THE HOUSE ON 92ND STREET, 88m.
Torn from still-wet headlines and widely cited as the first modern-style docudrama, this 20th Century Fox potboiler is about Nazi secret agents tearassing around NYC trying to steal our atomic-bomb secrets. Leo G. Carroll, William Blythe, Signe Hasso, Gene Lockhart star [with a very young E.G. Marshall making his screen debut] under the direction of Henry Hathaway.

10AM-Noon, FMC: THE DARK CORNER, 99m.
Noon-2PM, FMC: THE STREET WITH NO NAME
A sentence probably ever before typed: "Wow, a Mark Stevens double feature!" Two nice 20th Century Fox noirs starring the largely forgotten leading man; to show his versatility, he played a determined FBI Agent in the former and a determined private eye in the latter. William Keighley directed STREET with fine acting from Richard Widmark, Ed Begley and Barbara Lawrence; CORNER co-stars Lucille Ball [yes really] and Clifton Webb, with support from William Bendix. Henry Hathaway directs from Jay Dratler's & Bernard C. Schoenfeld's screenplays from Leo Rosten's story.

2PM-3:45PM, TCM: MONTE WALSH, 99m.
Even in a nominee field as packed as "Visually Gorgeous Westerns of the Widescreen-Color Era," this a gorgeous movie. Cinematographer-turned-director William A. Fraker and screenwriters David Zelag Goodman and Lukas Heller stared down The End Of The Old West and came up with a story that doesn't play like cliched metacommentary on how the Western genre itself was ending. Lee Marvin, Jack Palance and an absolutely haunting Jeanne Moreau star.

8PM-10PM, TCM: GIGI, 116m.
Paris! Romance! Singing! Dancing! Leslie Caron! Maurice Chevalier! Louis Jourdan! Vincente Minnelli!

10PM-11PM, H: SEX IN THE CIVIL WAR
11PM-12AM, H: MORE SEX IN THE CIVIL WAR
I love these dirty History documentaries. [Reairs at 2:01AM.]

10PM-11:45PM, Sun: THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD, 100m.
Guy Maddin's best. Mark McKinney is a great leading man. [Reairs at 3:25AM and on the 30th at 6:40AM and 2:15PM.]

10:30PM-12:05AM, SHO: SUPER SIX WORLD BOXING CLASSIC "Andre Dirrell vs. Arthur Abraham"
Assuming this one isn't pushed back again -- it's been a rough year or so for big fights being delayed and/or canceled -- this could be the fight of the month. The non-PPV fight, certainly. [Reairs on SHO2 at Midnight.]

10:30PM-12:30AM, HBO: BOXING AFTER DARK "Marcos Rene Maidana vs. Victor Cayo"
I don't know, I'm a lot more excited to see the rematch between Joan Guzman and Ali Funeka, following a pretty one-sided beatdown from Funeka that ended with a baffling, infuriating majority-draw decision from the judges. Here's hoping that he comes in motivated enough to keep the decision the hell out of their hands. [Reairs at 10AM and at midnight Monday/Tuesday.]


Sunday, March 28


2AM-3:45AM, TCM: THE HAPPY TIME, 94m.
Having watched mostly from the edges of his oeuvre in, it seems that director Richard Fleischer never should have stopped making programmer Noirs. I'm quite interested to see this Quebecois family drama to see if Fleischer's postwar prime extended beyond the thriller genre. Charles Boyer, Louis Jourdan and Bobby Driscoll star.

4:15AM-6AM, FMC: WIZARDS, 80m.
This Ralph Bakshi fantasy is well worth watching. Once. I'm afraid it's more interesting for its avoidable flaws than its achieved intentions.

6AM-7:30AM, FMC: THE BULLFIGHTERS, 69m.
Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy bring their prime film careers to an end with this nominal feature about a pair of gringo detectives confronted in Mexico by a man they wrongly helped send to prison.

7:30AM-Noon, FMC: BLOOD AND SAND, 125m.
Tyrone Power! Linda Darnell! Rita Hayworth! Rouben Mamoulian! When they were all young-ish! A really young Anthony Quinn! Vicente Blasco Ibanez's novel! Bull fights! Passion! Technicolor!

10AM-11:45AM, FMC: THE MARK OF ZORRO, 94m.
An enjoyable romantic adventure from the team of director Rouben Mamoulian and stars Tyrone Power and Linda Darnell.

10:30AM-Noon, TCM: BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN, 87m.
There seems to be a small, ill-advised cycle of pre-war Hollywood movies that featured caucasian actors in extensive make-up to look Asian but are more sentimental than outright racist [i.e. not the slap-a-Jap jingoism of WWII or Mickey Rooney's yellowface]: THE HATCHET MAN, THE GOOD EARTH, THE GENERAL DIED AT DAWN, later DRAGONSEED with Katherine Hepburn. This is one of the earliest, if not the first of the cycle -- a Frank Capra romantic drama about an American missionary and a Chinese warlord. Barbara Stanwyck, Nils Asther and Walter Connolly star.

Noon-2PM, TCM: LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA, 102m.
Early '60s family drama starring Olivia de Havilland, Yvette Mimieux and George Hamilton. I'd watch it for de Havilland.

2PM-4PM, TCM: SUNSET BOULEVARD, 110m.
Billy Wilder's classic Hollywood Noir about a failed screenwriter and a deluded silent-film starlet. Gloria Swanson and William Holden star, with memorable support from Erich von Stroheim and Buster Keaton.

2PM-3:45AM, IFC: RADIOHEAD: MEETING PEOPLE IS EASY, 98m.
Grant Gee's portrait of the band during the recording of OK COMPUTER and subsequent world tour. SPOILER: Life in Radiohead is nothing like being a member of Van Halen. END SPOILER.

4PM-6PM, TCM: THE SNAKE PIT, 108m.
Olivia de Havilland really excelled at playing damaged but courageous women after her informal partnership with Errol Flynn ended. I'm not much of an Anatole Litvak fan, but this mental-institution story is remarkably solid for 1948. Mark Stevens and Leo Genn co-star.

5:50PM-8:30PM, Sun: A CHRISTMAS TALE, 152m.
A Christmas family comedy [sorta] from Arnaud Desplechin,
Catherine Deneuve and Jean-Paul Roussillon? I'm sold, but why show an Xmas movie in March? Mathieu Amalric and Emmanuelle Devos costar. [Reairs at 4:05AM.]

8PM-10PM, TCM: THE EGG AND I, 108m.
A little on the late side [1947] to cash in on any wave of the semi-regular fad for chicken-farming -- it's interesting that both Carl Barks and the Marx Brothers tried to be chicken farmers before giving up and going into the easier rackets of movies and comics -- but who's to complain about having the pleasure of Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray's company for almost two hours?

9PM-10PM, HBO: THE PACIFIC: Episode Three, 56m.
I'm going to guess that this episode features American soldiers killing and/or being killed by Japanese soldiers. [Reairs on the 30 and 31.]

10:00 PM-Midnight, TCM: GEORGE WASHINGTON SLEPT HERE, 91m.
Writers Moss Hart & George S. Kaufman, director William Keighley and actress Ann Sheridan followed up THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER with this amusing but ill-fitting Jack Benny vehicle, made and released the same year. Benny was a stellar comedian -- an anti-comedian, actually -- but he couldn't make movies work for him since so much of his humor came out of character development that literally took years to hone. But, taken as just a comedy -- or better, an Ann Sheridan comedy -- it's quite satisfying.


Monday, March 29


Midnight-1AM, TCM: SHERLOCK JR., 44m.
1AM-2:15AM, TCM: THE NAVIGATOR, 60m.
2:15AM-4AM, TCM: MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY, 87m.
4AM-6AM, TCM: MON ONCLE, 116m.
A double double-feature of movies by two of the greatest silent clowns, Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati. ONCLE is one of my favorites, not only funny and beautiful [late '50s France looks stunning in Eastmancolor] but a sui generis example of my beloved subgenre, the coming-of-age-with-an-eccentric-uncle movie.

12:05AM-2:15AM, Sun: RESCUE DAWN, 125m.
Werner Herzog dramatizes his documentary LITTLE DIETER NEEDS TO FLY as a Hollywood P.O.W.-escape movie. I'm not a big fan of this one but it's fascinating to compare the doc to the drama. The most crackling action in DAWN isn't between the prisoners and the Laotian guards but between century-class character actors Steve Zahn and Jeremy Davies as they bulldoze star Christian Bale in their twitching battle to steal the most scenes.

5:55AM-7:45AM, IFC: CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS, 104m.
I haven't seen this since it came out on VHS; I'm very curious to see how Woody Allen & Alan Alda's four-handed [well, maybe two and a half] middle finger to Larry Gelbart plays out now that he's dead. I didn't know that Alda was imitating him when I saw it, but I remember wondering why Allen seemed to want us to dislike Alda's character when he didn't seem so bad, just a little too glib -- I chalked it up to yet another actor not wanting to be disliked. I'm really hoping that I'm old enough to appreciate the Martin Landau-Anjelica Huston-Jerry Orbach half of the film. It can't be as leaden as I thought, it was me not getting it, right? [Reairs at 11:30AM and 5:15PM.]

6AM-7:30AM, TCM: DOCTOR X, 76m.
Pretty routine Old Dark House movie whose stock is raised considerably by being photographed in two-strip Technicolor, one of the most fascinating looks available in color film but was never seriously explored [supposedly, Warner Bros. had this movie shot with it because they had a surplus]. Lee Tracy, Lionel Atwill and Fay Wray star, Michael Curtiz directs.

8:30AM-9:30AM, Sun: JOAN MITCHELL: PORTRAIT OF AN ABSTRACT PAINTER, 58m.
Marion Cajori's frank, invaluable portrait of the trailblazing female abstract-expressionist action painter is a woefully underrated contribution to art history and, as I recall, a pretty fun movie. If the moraine terminus of her commentary in the movie is any indication, it was wise of Mitchell to be so reclusive in her career; otherwise she might have been the first person to be lynched in a Parisian gallery, which is another reason why she's awesome. [Reairs at 2:45PM.]

8PM-9:20PM, Sun: I LIKE KILLING FLIES, 78m.
What is it about living and working in NYC that makes some people lose their goddamn minds? Matt Mahurin profiles foul-mouthed chef/philosopher Kenny Shopsin and his eponymous Greenwich Village greasy spoon just prior to it losing its lease and having to move. [Reairs at 1:20AM.]

8PM-9:30PM, TCM: MONKEY BUSINESS, 78m.
9:30PM-10:45PM, TCM: HORSE FEATHERS, 67m.
10:45PM-Midnight, TCM: DUCK SOUP, 69m.
An Evening With The Brothers Marx: Their last three films as a quartet before Zeppo quit and they moved to MGM. BUSINESS is the one where they're stowaways on an ocean liner and FEATHERS is the college-football one; Thelma Todd co-stars in and Norman Z. McLeod directs both. SOUP is the consensus high point for the Marx's filmography; Groucho is inexplicably named dictator of a country, oh course you know this means war, etc. Leo McCarey directs, Louis Calhern, Margaret Dumont and Raquel Torres co-star.

11PM-Midnight, Sun: A SKIN TOO FEW: THE DAYS OF NICK DRAKE, 48m.
Jeroen Berkvens's documentary about the late singer-songwriter is wispy but solid, just like a good Nick Drake song. [Reairs at 4:20AM.]

And there's another week.

The 2100th step on the last road home.

Little Man 03/16/10

First, he embraced his inner billygoat by climbing to the second-highest spot in the living room -- would have gone to the very top if I hadn't wrestled him down. (I can't reach the top without a ladder.)

Then, he clearly can't fucking believe that I photographed him sitting next to a gigantic sweet potato. In retrospect, neither do I -- although, I'm pretty sure that this isn't the first "Littles & Yam" photo in our oeuvre, but I'm not digging through thousands of shots to find out. Anyone remember any such photos?

The 2095th step on the last road home.

Weekly DVD Alert Fifteen: March 15-March 22, 2010

Check your local listings, etc.


Click for slightly larger.



Monday, March 15



Midnight-1:30AM, TCM: THE MAGICIAN, 79m.
This week's Silent Sunday is a 1926 Rex Ingram drama: "A devil worshiper tries to seduce a young innocent." SOLD! Paul Wegener, Ivan Petrovitch and Alice Terry star.

4:15AM-6AM, TCM: BRUTE FORCE, 98m.
A postwar Jules Dassin thriller about some convicts preparing to smash their way off the drain-pipe detail and on to freedom. Burt Lancaster [in, I think, his feature-film debut], Vince Barnett and Hume Cronyn star.

6AM-8AM, FMC: NIGHTMARE ALLEY, 110m.
Tyrone Power, getting ground into the dirt and then ground even further! Joan Blondell, being so lovely you'll want to punch yourself in the face after a while! Edmund Goulding, in a once-in-a-lifetime performance as a director! George Jessel, earning a producer credit in his filmography guaranteed to trigger generations of double-takes to come! Circus Noir Overdrive!

8PM-10:15PM, TCM: BOOM TOWN, 119m.
I'm often surprised to see that Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy didn't really make that many movies together; they had an exciting, engaging chemistry. Hedy Lamarr and Claudette Colbert co-star under direction by Jack Conway.

10PM-Midnight, SHO2: SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING "Edwin Valero vs. Antonio DeMarco"
Edwin Valero's American-television coming-out party. It's a terrible idea for him to move up in weight as fast as he can when he's still a young man and one hell of a banger as a lightweight. [Reairs on the 15th at 10PM.]

10:15PM-12:15AM, TCM: THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER, 118m.
Warner Bros. workhorses William Keighley & Laird Doyle's adaptation of the Mark Twain novel. The Mauch twins star, with support from Errol Flynn and Claude Rains.

10:30PM-12:10AM, IFC: KURT COBAIN: ABOUT A SON, 96m.
The most attractive aspect of this particular recounting of Cobain's story is that he narrates it himself via a cache of interview recordings. [Reairs on the 20th at 8PM and on the 21st at 4AM.]

11PM-12:30AM, Sun: ALICE NEEL, 83m.
Andrew Neel assembled a fascinating, appropriately frustrating profile of his grandmother, the late great portrait painter Alice Neel. [Replays at 4:40AM.]


Tuesday, March 16


12:15AM-2:15AM, IFC: THE CROSSING GUARD, 120m.
Sean Penn's sophomore outing as a writer/director stars Jack Nicholson and Anjelica Huston as parents of a child killed by a drunk-driving David Morse. I'm not wild about Penn's Cassavettes pastiches -- Penn seems to see Cassavettes' more unfortunate habits as his most admirable traits -- but I could watch the scene where Nicholson dismissively manhandles Robbie Robertson over and over. [Reairs on the 24th at 6PM.]

2AM-4AM, FMC: MILLER'S CROSSING, 115m.
The Coen's finest, so I've been told. It's my favorite, but I'm a soft touch for Gabriel Byrne and Marcia Gay Harden. John Turturro, Jon Polito and Albert Finney co-star.

5:20AM-9:15PM, Indie: ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA, 229m.
One of the few four-hour films that can [or should] easily sell you on sitting for the whole thing with just a thumbnail description: "Sergio Leone's GODFATHER, but Jewish." I wonder if the stories that Leone's rough cut was eight to ten hours long are true, and if that footage still exists if it ever did; there's a TV miniseries that would still rake in eyeballs 25 years later. Robert De Niro heads a hugh cast featuring Joe Pesci, Burt Ward [at long last, both greasy sidekicks in the same movie], James Woods, Elizabeth McGovern, Danny Aiello, Tuesday Weld, Treat Williams, William Forsythe, et al. with Jennifer Connelly making her film debut. [Reairs at 5:05PM, and the 27th at 5:45AM and 3:25PM.]

6:30AM-8AM, Sun: LYNCH, 84m.
Soren Larsen's portrait of David Lynch, made during his making of INLAND EMPIRE. [Reairs at 11:30AM and 4:20PM.]

7:30AM-8:45AM, TCM: THE BIG TIMER, 72m.
Yeah, it's a boxing movie, but I'm interested to see more of Thelma Todd. Ben Lyon and Constance Cummings co-star under Edward Buzzell's direction.

7:45AM-9:30AM, IFC: SHATTERED GLASS, 94m.
I guess Hayden Christensen has officially been typecast as the go-to guy for whiney, ineffectual protagonists now. I'm a soft touch for journalist movies, and it's sort of fun to watch Anakin Skywalker struggle to not be outacted by the far-stronger ensemble of actors around him, especially understatement-maker supreme Peter Sarsgaard and Steve Zahn's irrepressible scene bandit. [Reairs at 1:05PM, 5:40AM, 7:35AM and 4:20PM.]

8:45AM-10AM, TCM: THE MIND READER, 70m.
10AM-11:30AM, TCM: THE CLAIRVOYANT, 81m.
A pair of early '30s fake-psychic potboilers: The former features Warren William, Constance Cummings and Allen Jenkins under director Roy Del Ruth; the latter can boast of stars Claude Rains, Fay Wray and Jane Baxter, with Maurice Elvey directing.

10AM-11:45AM, FMC: THE MARK OF ZORRO, 94m.
An enjoyable romantic adventure from the team of director Rouben Mamoulian and stars Tyrone Power and Linda Darnell. [Reairs on the 28th at 10AM.]

11:30AM-1PM, TCM: THE LAVENDER HILL MOB, 81m.
Another fine Alec Guinness heist movie. Stanley Holloway and Sidney James co-star.

1PM-4PM, TCM: THE GREAT ESCAPE, 172m.
You know you love John Sturges' international all-star WWII POW epic. James Garner, Steve McQueen, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, et al co-star.

3:30PM-5:45PM, FMC: HOW TO STEAL A MILLION, 123m.
William Wyler! Audrey Hepburn! Hugh Griffith! Peter O'Toole! Charles Boyer! Eli Wallach!

8PM-10PM, H: SAMURAI
History Channel documentary about the Japanese warriors and the great 16th-century master Miyamoto Musashi in particular. [Reairs at 12:01AM and on the 20th at 5PM.]

8PM-10:45PM, TCM: THE BAD SLEEP WELL, 151m.
10:45PM-1:15AM, TCM: HIGH AND LOW, 143m.
The celebration of Akira Kurosawa's centennial continues with this double feature of early '60s urban dramas. The scenes in LOW's "High" half may been the best acting in Kurosawa's entire oeuvre. Toshiro Mifune and Kyoko Kagawa star in both.

10PM-11:30PM, Sun: KEANE, 90m.
Lodge Kerrigan and Damian Lewis present a jittery first-person perspective of a man stumbling down the line between mental illness and outright insanity. Amy Ryan and Abigail Breslin co-star. [Reairs at 3AM and 6:20PM.

10PM-Midnight, SHOFamily: BUD GREENSPAN'S KINGS OF THE RING: FOUR LEGENDS OF HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING
A stately collection of profiles of Jack Johnson, Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis and Muhammad Ali. [Reairs at 4:20AM.]

10:30PM-12:15AM, IFC: RADIOHEAD: MEETING PEOPLE IS EASY, 98m.
Grant Gee's portrait of the band during the recording of OK COMPUTER and subsequent world tour. SPOILER: Life in Radiohead is nothing like being a member of Van Halen. END SPOILER. [Reairs on the 28th at 2PM.]


Wednesday, March 17


1:15AM-4:30AM, TCM: RED BEARD, 185m.
The Kurosawa marathon continues with this medical epic starring Mifune, Yuzo Kayama and Yoshio Tsuchiya.

4:30AM-6:15AM, TCM: I LIVE IN FEAR, 103m.
I'm not thrilled that Turner has been burying A.K.'s non-action dramas in the schedule graveyard, but I shouldn't complain as FEAR is one of his least-seen '50s films. A great character study and meditation on the fear of nuclear annihilation -- not exactly as crowd-pleasing as GOJIRA, made around the same time -- starring Kamatari Fujiwara, Kazuo Kato and Mifune.

6:15AM-8AM, TCM: SCANDAL, 105m.
A 1950 drama that Kurosawa used as a vehicle to ponder tabloid journalism and fame. Stars Yoko Katsuragi, Mifune and Noriko Sengoku.

7:15AM-8:45AM, IFC: CHAN IS MISSING, 80m.
Wayne Wang's movies improve as his budgets shrink; this shaggy, ambling illustration of a community has a nominal plot -- two Chinatown cabbies look for Chan, the guy who ripped them off -- and tons of character[s]. Wang's the filmmaker who one-upped a Paul Auster script by making an improv film [BLUE IN THE FACE] between takes on SMOKE, right? [Reairs at 1:35PM.]

10:30AM-Noon, HBO: ASSAULT IN THE RING, 83m.
A truly gripping, admirably nuanced look at the controversial 1983 Luis Resto-Billy Collins boxing match, and the many lives it destroyed. Eric Drath raised the bar on sports documentary-making, and HBO Sports deserves props for not shying away from presenting a candid and honest look at the shady aspects of its centerpiece sport.

8:30AM-10:25AM, Indie: NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, 113m.
It's strange how this movie … well, it rarely pops up at all in conversations, but I was going to say that it's strange that it rarely pops up in discussions of artistically successful film adaptations of novels. There's really nothing you could add or subtract from it to improve it, is there? The sets are the right kind of squalid futurism, the script doesn't whitewash the more horrifying ideas in Orwell's book and the casting couldn't be better -- John Hurt was the perfect choice for Winston Smith; Richard Burton made an ideal O'Brien and Suzanna Hamilton's Julia is the right mix of heartless and sensual. Michael Radford, we salute you. [Reairs at 4:45PM, and on the 26th at 4:10AM and 3:30PM, then on the 30th at 4:10AM and 3:20PM.]

9:25AM-10:15AM, Sun: A SKIN TOO FEW: THE DAYS OF NICK DRAKE, 48m.
Jeroen Berkvens's documentary about the late singer-songwriter is wispy but solid, just like a good Nick Drake song. [Reairs on the 29th at 11PM and the 30th at 4:20AM.]

2:30PM-4PM, TCM: PEG O' MY HEART, 87m.
Normally the phrase "spunky Irish girl" and a title like this are more than enough to get me to purge it all from my memory, but it's a [presumably talkie] Robert Z. Leonard movie starring Marion Davies. Praying that it's a comedy.

6PM-, FMC: CLAUDINE,
John Barry is a fascinating case -- a Mercury Theatre alumnus, blacklisted in the 1950s, etc. -- CLAUDINE may not be a JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN or a SALT OF THE EARTH, but it's a remarkable achievement from a director who strove for something more than genre crowd-pleasing. [Reairs on the 25th at 4:15AM.]

8PM-9:45PM, Sun: THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE, 104m.
Luis Bunuel's final movie. Fernando Rey stars as man in love with his maid, as played by Angela Molina and Carole Bouquet; sexy funny times ensue. [Reairs at 3AM.]

11PM-1:05PM, Sun: RESCUE DAWN, 125m.
Werner Herzog dramatizes his documentary LITTLE DIETER NEEDS TO FLY as a Hollywood P.O.W.-escape movie. I'm not a big fan of this one but it's fascinating to compare the doc to the drama. The most crackling action in DAWN isn't between the prisoners and the Laotian guards but between century-class character actors Steve Zahn and Jeremy Davies as they bulldoze star Christian Bale in their twitching battle to steal the most scenes. [Reairs at 4:45AM, on the 24th at 1AM and on the 29th at 12:05AM.]


Thursday, March 18


Midnight-2:45AM, Sun: A CHRISTMAS TALE, 152m.
A Christmas family comedy [sorta] from Arnaud Desplechin,
Catherine Deneuve and Jean-Paul Roussillon? I'm sold, but why show an Xmas movie in March? Mathieu Amalric and Emmanuelle Devos costar. [Reairs on the 28th at 5:50PM and on the 29th at 4:05AM.]

6AM-8AM, FMC: THE SHERIFF OF FRACTURED JAW, 103m.
A late model, uncharacteristic Raoul Walsh Western, starring Kenneth More, Jayne Mansfield and Connie Francis as Mansfield's singing voice for one of those insipid but undeniably memorable theme songs that you normally have to hire Rod McKuen to write.

7AM-9:45AM, Sun: THE YACOUBIAN BUILDING, 165m.
A recent Egyptian metaphorical epic about the inhabitants of a run-down Cairo apartment building. [Reairs at 2PM, on the 23rd at 6:15AM and 1:35PM and on the 31st at 7:30AM and 2PM.]

8AM-10AM, FMC: O. HENRY'S FULL HOUSE, 117m.
I've not been very into Fox's mid-'50s line of multi-unit anthology movies, but a cycle of short films based on O. Henry's short stories was a natural. I thought it was weird that, of Jean Negulesco, Henry Hathaway, Howard Hawks, Henry King and Henry Koster, Hawks' segment was widely cited by critics as the weakest and was actually cut by the producers before the film received a wide release. Then I saw the film; Hawks' yarn about two city-slicker crooks [Fred Allen and Oscar Levant, no less] getting more than they bargained for when they kidnap a hayseed child is solid, but it's out of place in an anthology of Henry's urban fables. [The Hawks piece was restored when the film was first syndicated in the '60s, probably more to help fill a time slot than out of any aesthetic consideration.]

9:45AM-11:30AM, Sun: METROPOLITAN, 98m.
Whit Stillman's debut as a writer-director, a Wilde-esque comedy of manners and another fine movie that makes you love Christopher Eigeman at the same time you want to punch his character in the mouth. Edward Clements co-stars. [Reairs at 4:45PM and on the 27th at 8:15AM.]

3PM-5PM, FMC: H.E.A.L.T.H., 105m.
In the abstract, this should be fantastic: A ensemble comedy about a health-food convention by Robert Altman in his prime, with a cast boasting of James Garner, Carol Burnett, Alfre Woodard, Lauren Bacall, Paul Dooley, Donald Moffat, Henry Gibson, Dick Cavett, Dinah Shore, et al. It was better than I remembered -- saggy and directionless -- but it doesn't have a puncher's chance at surpassing your expectations. FYI: I understand that securing the rights to show the many real-world health-food logos and references may prove too difficult for the film to ever see a commercial DVD release any time soon.

4:45PM-6PM, TCM: DOWN TO EARTH, 101m.
I'm a sucker for a dancing Rita Hayworth movie. Larry Parks and James Gleason co-star under direction by Alexander Hall.

5PM-6:30PM, FMC: SILENT MOVIE, 87m.
Mel Brooks assembles his crew -- Marty Feldman, Dom DeLuise, Sid Caesar, Ron Carey and Bernadette Peters this time -- and gives silent cinema the business. [Reairs on the 23rd at 1:15AM and 4:30AM.]

6:30PM-8:05PM, FMC:THE ADVENTURE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES' SMARTER BROTHER, 91m.
If you squint, this movie could look like a lost mid-'70s Mel Brooks film; Gene Wilder wrote the screenplay and stars with Madeline Kahn, Marty Feldman, Leo McKern and Dom Deluise in this specifically sub-genre specific spoof, complete the inspired Brooksian stunt-casting of Leo McKern as Professor Moriarty. But Wilder also directed the film and showed that he is no borscht-belt fartypants like his one-time mentor, producing a far more adult piece of silliness than YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN or HIGH ANXIETY.

8PM-10PM, TCM: MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, 97m.
John Ford's gorgeous take on Wyatt Earp's battle with the Clantons. Henry Fonda, Victor Mature and Walter Brennan star.

10PM-12:15AM, TCM: GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL, 123m.
John Sturges' epic take on Wyatt Earp's battle with the Clantons. Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Jo Van Fleet star.

10:30PM-, IFC: loudQUIETloud: A FILM ABOUT THE PIXIES, 85m.
The new gold standard in concert-tour documentaries, and I'm not even that big a Pixies fan. I could do with more Kim Deal not being recognized by checkout clerks and less Black Francis manmories, though.


Friday, March 19


Midnight-1:45AM, IFC: THE COOLER, 103m.
Wayne Kramer's romantic drama about a professional cooler, an unlucky man hired by casinos to somehow rub some of their unluckiness on the high-rolling gamblers in their joint. This sounds too stupidly superstitious to not be real. William H. Macy stars, with Alec Baldwin, Ron Livingston and Maria Bello -- again, does Bello plays every waitress/whore in every movie made in Las Vegas, or does it just seem that way? -- with cameos from Joey Fatone and Paul Sorvino as lounge singers. It's that kind of indie film. [Reairs on the 30th at Midnight.]

Midnight-2AM, FMC, THE VAN, 100m.
The final part of Roddy Doyle's "Barrytown Trilogy," [following THE COMMITMENTS and THE SNAPPER] is a more straightforward comedy about two goofs deciding to make their living selling fish & chips out of a van. Colm Meaney and Donal O'Kelly star, and Stephen Frears directs from Doyle's screenplay adaptation of his novel.

12:15AM-2AM, TCM: HOUR OF THE GUN, 101m.
John Sturges' actorly sequel to Wyatt Earp's battle with the Clantons. James Garner, Jason Robards, Jr. and Robert Ryan star.

2AM-3:30AM, TCM: MASTERSON OF KANSAS, 72m.
William Castle's programmer take on Bat Masterson joining Wyatt Earp's battle with the Clantons. George Montgomery, Nancy Gates and James Griffith star.

6:35AM-8:35AM, Sun: NIGHTS OF CABIRIA, 118m.
It's startling and enchanting how late-period Chaplinesque this this early Fellini film is; the film even looks like a sound-era Chaplin in its grain. Giulietta Masina stars, with Amadeo Nazzari. [Reairs at 1:30PM, on the 25th at 6PM and on the 26th at 5:15AM and 12:30PM.]

8:35AM-10:30AM, Sun: THE HOME SONG STORIES, 103m.
Tony Ayres wrote and directed this semi-autobiographical, appropriately meandering movie about his desperately materialistic single-mother [Joan Chen], his sister and their ever-shifting home life. I still haven't actually Googled it yet to confirm, but the idea that Joan Chen's not only a protege of Chairman Mao's wife, but may also still be pro-Cultural Revolution even now has made her much less bonerific in my eyes. Eye. Whether that's true or not, my penis and its two closest advisers in the Gang of Three have already denounced me for being Counter-Revolutionary. Still, Chen is compelling in this film, letting the viewer in on everything she's feeling except, in key points, whatever the thoughts are every mother clearly hides from her children. [Reairs at 3:30PM and on the 23rd at 9AM and 4:20PM.]

Noon-2PM, FMC: BANDOLERO!, 106m.
You would think that Dean Martin would be a bad fit for Westerns, but he's often the best part of the ones he's in -- even RIO BRAVO wouldn't be as great without Dino. BANDOLERO! is no BRAVO but it can sit proudly next to THE PROFESSIONALS, which shares a lot of the same tropes and possibly a few character actors, and the better late '60s light Westerns. The scene where Dean and Jimmy Stewart talk about what Indians there are in Montana should be a classic, but it might rely too much on context to appreciate. Raquel Welch, Will Geer, Andrew Prine and George Kennedy co-star, Andrew V. Mclaglen directs from James Lee Barrett's screenplay based on Stanley Hough's story.

3:33PM- , FMC: THE DETECTIVE, 114m.
I really can't tell these "Tony Rome" movies apart, but they're good potsimmerers. I think this is the one where he plays Rome with a different name, and the film ends with Sinatra admiring Lee Remick's ass as she walks away. Class. Features supporting acting from a small army of solid character actors, including Jack Klugman, Lloyd Bochner, Ralph Meeker, William Windom, Tony Musante and Robert Duvall, and a bit part from Sugar Ray Robinson. Gordon Douglas directs from Abby Mann's screenplay based on Roderick Thorp's novel.

6:05PM-7:50PM, IFC: INTERMISSION, 102m.
John Crowley made his debut as a director with this clever early '00s ensemble crime movie. Not nearly an Irish Altman movie but far less annoying and self-important as the Sandra Bullock CRASH. Colin Farrell, Colm Meaney, Cillian Murphy, Kelly MacDonald [does anyone else remember when she was going to become the next Winona Ryder?] Michael McElhatton, David Wilmot, Brian F. O'Byrne and Shirley Henderson star. [Reairs at 2:10AM.]

7PM-10PM, ESPN2: CLASSIC BOXING "Mike Tyson"
A block of Iron Mike fights: First, the 1986 three-rounder against Steve Zouski, followed by the James "Quick" Tillis fight, which took Tyson into deep waters for his first judges-decision win, then Tyson becomes the youngest heavyweight champion ever by destroying Trevor Berbick in two rounds. At 9PM, they're showing the 1990 Tyson vs. James "Buster" Douglas upset, because we can't see this and Ali vs. Foreman often enough.

8PM-10PM, TCM: THE BROWNING VERSION, 90m.
10PM-Midnight, TCM: GOODBYE MR. CHIPS, 114m.
An unhappy-teacher double feature. For some deranged reason, I always thought that BROWNING was a biopic about the man who perfected the machine gun. Apparently, it's a British film about a soon-to-retire schoolteacher struggling to find meaning to his life. I assume there will be a lot less gunfire in this film than I expected. Michael Redgrave, Jean Kent and Nigel Patrick star under Anthony Asquith's direction. CHIPS is a more cheerful American story starring the mighty Robert Donat, with Greer Garson and Paul Henreid and direction by Sam Wood.

10PM-11PM, SHO2: SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING "Israel Vazquez vs. Rafael Marquez I & II"
11PM-1AM, SHO: SHOBOX: THE NEW GENERATION
Just a nice little night at the fights, spanned across two channels: a rerun of the first two of the Marquez-Vazquez wars, followed by a new fight card on the main channel featuring boxers with names you probably kinda sorta recognize. [SHOBOX reairs on SHO2 at 1AM.]

10PM-Midnight, ESPN2: FRIDAY NIGHT FIGHTS
Light-middleweights Deandre Latimore and Sechew Powell headline another card of live boxing. [Reairs Sunday at 1AM.]

10:30PM-12:35AM, IFC: JOE STRUMMER: THE FUTURE IS UNWRITTEN, 123m.
Julien Temple's 2007 documentary on the already iconic late musician and activist.


Saturday, March 20


12:35AM-2:10AM, IFC: KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS, 94m.
William Shatner fights thousands of hungry spiders. I've seen the movie twice, and I still can't tell you who won. It's nice that IFC and indie douchebags have finally embraced drive-in movies as part of the independent-film scene/history, even if it took Tarantino and Rodriguez's pretentious faux-grindhouse double-feature a few years ago.

2AM-3:30AM, TCM: KITTEN WITH A WHIP, 83m.
Delinquent Ann-Margret escapes from a 1964 reform school and holds a politician hostage. How good could it be? John Forsythe and Peter Brown co-star under Douglas Heyes' direction

3:30AM-5:15AM, TCM: CAGED, 97m.
The ladies continue to go crazy on Turner Classic Movies: Eleanor Parker stars as an innocent trapped in a women's prison. Agnes Moorehead [total Bull] and Hope Emerson co-star under John Cromwell's direction.

5:15AM-5:38AM, TCM Short: BOOKED FOR SAFEKEEPING, 32m.
I saw this training film a while ago, but I remember being surprised by how not-totally awful the police were trained to be to the mentally ill that they encountered in 1960. These days, of course, the cops have no choice but to taser first and ask questions later if the tased survive.

6AM- , BACHELOR FLAT, 91 or 88m.
ALL HAIL FRANK TASHLIN! TASHLIN IS THE WAY AND THE LIGHT!! A 1962 comedy starring Tuesday Weld, with Terry-Thomas in the sexually-put-upon leading-man role that actors like Dick Powell and Tom Ewell filled in Tash's '50s films? What more could you want? Richard Beymer and Celeste Holm co-star. [Reairs at 2PM.]

6AM-8:30AM, TCM: DESTINATION TOKYO, 135m.
I don't hope for much from this wartime Delmer Davies-made submarine movie except lots of scenes with Cary Grant and John Garfield playing off each other.

8:30AM-10:30AM, TCM: KISS ME DEADLY, 106m.
I'm working on a time machine solely so that I can pluck Robert Aldrich and his team out of 1955 to record a commentary track for this movie. Ralph Meeker, Cloris Leachman and Albert Dekker star.

8:30AM-10AM, Sun: ERASERHEAD, 85m.
David Lynch's debut feature film. It's a classic. I haven't seen it. Chinga tu madre, cineastehole. [Reairs at 4PM, on the 24th at 10:30PM, on the 25th at 5:45AM and on the 29th at 11:50PM.]

Noon-2PM, TCM: THE OUTLAW, 116m.
It's hard to tell, but I suspect that producer/director Howard Hughes kinda had a thing for Jane Russell. Maybe. Jack Beutel and Walter Huston co-star.

2PM-4:15PM, TCM: STALAG 17, 120m.
Billy Wilder's WWII P.O.W. film. Stars William Holden, Don Taylor and Otto Preminger.

4:15PM-6PM, TCM: 12 ANGRY MEN, 96m.
Is this the legal drama that made Sidney Lumet the go-to guy for legal dramas? Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb and E.G. Marshall star.

6PM-8PM, TCM: SPELLBOUND, 111m.
Not nearly as sexy as NOTORIOUS and Hitchcock's presentation of psychiatry is about as realistic as the clouds in ROPE, but Gregory Peck made an interesting leading man in a Hitch movie because he's the wrong man to play "The Wrong Man". Ingrid Bergman and Michael Chekhov co-star.

7:30PM-9PM, Sun: NEAL CASSADY, 80m.
I don't recognize writer/director Noah Buschel's name and I'm leery of the idea of Tate Donovan playing the title role, but I love stories about the creative-arts equivalent of the Pretty Girl's Best Friend. [See also: Joe Ancis, Noel Sickles, John Houseman.] [Reairs at 2:15AM and on the 25th at 11PM.]

8PM-10PM, FMC: THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW, 100m.
It's so weird to think that this movie was once considered a terrible movie -- it's no CITIZEN KANE, but it's certainly better than any other movie that has any combination of "ROCKY" "HORROR" and "PICTURE SHOW" and a respectable number of movies that have a "THE" in the title -- I imagine largely because it was a flop. [Someday, probably after some real entertainment company properly releases it on DVD so it can finally connect with its audience, lazy-minded morons will stop making jokes about ISHTAR; the movie's a bit of a mess, but it's smart and funny.] Richard O'Brien and Jim Sharman, with Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick, Tim Curry, Patricia Quinn, Nell Campbell, Meat Loaf and the older guys who played Dr. Scott and the Criminologist, we salute you. [Reairs at 10PM and Midnight.]

8PM-Midnight, TCM: LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, 227m.
Saturday's alright for a David Lean epic. Or not. Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif and Alec Guinness star.

8PM-9:45AM, IFC: KURT COBAIN: ABOUT A SON, 96m.
The most attractive aspect of this particular recounting of Cobain's story is that he narrates it himself via a cache of interview recordings. [Reairs at 4AM.]

10PM-12:30AM, Sun: THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH, 139m.
The mid-'60s to mid-'70s were a golden age for speculative-fiction movies. This Nicolas Roeg-David Bowie-Rip Torn-led fable is one of my favorites of that cycle, and not just because it was the first time I saw a woman peeing. [Reairs at 3:45AM.]


Sunday, March 21


12:15AM-2:15AM, IFC: THE CHANGELING, 114m.
I don't know much about horror movies, but it certainly looks to me that this Peter Medak and George C. Scott collaboration [a heartbroken music professor/composer suspects that his new cottage in the woods is haunted by the ghost of a boy] was a bigger influence on the last few waves of Asian supernatural horror movies than anything else going on in the West circa 1980.

7:15AM-8:45AM, FMC: THE BLACK SWAN, 87m.
Tyrone Power! Maureen O'Hara! Anthony Quinn! Pirates! Technicolor!

10AM-Noon, TCM: MIDNIGHT, 94m.
Noon-2PM, TCM: THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK, 112m.
There are probably more than a few reasons why these movies never pop up in the endless discussions about how 1939 was the Greatest Year Ever in The Golden Age Of Hollywood. In MIDNIGHT, Claudette Colbert stars as an unemployed showgirl sent on a secret mission to Paris disguised as Hungarian royalty. Eek. Don Ameche and what was left of John Barrymore co-star under Mitchell Leisen's direction. MASK is a James Whale adaptation of the Three Musketeers story, starring Louis Hayward, Joan Bennett and Warren William.

1PM- FMC: THE GIRL CAN'T HELP IT, 99m.
Frank Tashlin brings his animated-cartoon chops to live-action film. Lurid full-color in Cinemascope, and performances from Fats Domino, Eddie Cochran, Little Richard, Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps and The Platters. Also, Jayne Mansfield's tits. There's an entire universe of a life lived in Tashlin's comment, "There's nothing in the world to me that's funnier than big breasts." Tom Ewell and Edmond O'Brien co-star. [Reairs on the 24th at 10AM.]

2:45PM-4:15PM, FMC: HIGH ANXIETY, 94m.
Mel Brooks does Alfred Hitchcock. Did he ever make a movie with Madeline Kahn, Cloris Leachman and Bernadette Peters? [Reairs on the 23rd at 2:45AM and on the 24 at 4PM.]

4:30PM-6:30PM, FMC: OUR MAN FLINT, 108m.
When no one's looking, I try to rewrite film histories to claim this 1966 James Coburn vehicle as a remake of ALPHAVILLE.

6PM-8PM, TCM: BORN YESTERDAY, 102m.
Judy Holliday! Broderick Crawford! William Holden! George Cukor!

6:15PM-8PM, IFC: ROBOCOP, 103m.
If you don't love Paul Verhoeven and this movie, preferably for reasons entirely different from the reasons you had on the first viewing, then we can't be friends. [One perennial reason for loving ROBOCOP: "Bitches, leave."] Peter Weller, Miguel Ferrer and Kirkwood Smith star. [Reairs at 1AM.]

7PM-9PM, Sun: LET'S GET LOST, 120m.
Everyone should see Bruce Weber's iconic profile of cool-jazz trumpeter/singer Chet Baker at least once; Sundance has scheduled it to air often enough this month that everyone will. [Reairs at 6:35AM and 11:55AM, on the 26th at 10:30AM and 5PM and on the 31st at Noon.]

8PM-10:30 FOX LEGACY: HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY,118m.
John Ford's gentle, elegiac classic about a family of Welsh coal miners beat out CITIZEN KANE, HERE COMES MR. JORDAN, THE LITTLE FOXES, THE MALTESE FALCON, SERGEANT YORK and SUSPICION for the Best Picture Oscar in 1941. I don't know if it deserved it -- the film raked in more Awards for Best Director and Best Supporting Actor, Best Art Direction and Best Cinematography as well as nominations for Best Supporting Actress, Best Film Editing Best Music for a Dramatic Picture, Best Sound Recording and Best Writing -- but it's undoubtedly one of John Ford's, Philip Dunne's, Walter Pidgeon's, Maureen O'Hara's, Donald Crisp's, Sara Allgood's and Roddy McDowall's greatest efforts. Warning: This is a "Fox Legacy" presentation of the movie, so the first 20 minutes or so will be FoxFilm CEO Tom Rothman talking about how awesome the movie and Fox are, so don't lowball the recording time on your TIVO/DVDR/Betamax timer.

8PM-10PM, TCM: THE OUTRAGE, 96m.
10PM-12:15AM, TCM: THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, 128m.
Context is everything; it's kind of cool to air a double-bill of American adaptations of Kurosawa classics [RASHOMON and THE SEVEN SAMURAI, respectively] but it's somewhat uncool to do it in the middle of his 100th-birth month. Or not, I dunno.

9PM-10PM, HBO: THE PACIFIC: Episode Two, 50m.
Part Two of Ten. It's World War II in the Pacific Theatre of Operations. That's all I know, honest. [Reairs on the 23, 24, 26, 27 and 31.]


Monday, March 22


12:15AM-1:30AM, TCM: OUR HOSPITALITY, 73m.
This week's silent Sunday is a 1923 feature from Buster Keaton, who plays a young man caught in the middle of a family feud. Keaton's wife Natalie Talmadge costars.

6:15AM-8AM, TCM: TAKE THE HIGH GROUND!, 101m.
8AM-9:45AM, TCM: FEAR STRIKES OUT, 100m.
A Karl Malden double feature that, no offense to the late Method great, I'm interested in solely because the former is a Richard Brooks-directed Korean War movie made too soon after the War ended to not be bitterly ironic [also, Richard Widmark stars], and the latter stars a young Anthony Perkins before PSYCHO typecast him. Then again, in FEAR, Perkins plays a Major League baseball player on the edge of insanity, but there's probably a lot less mother taxidermy in this movie.

7AM-10AM, FMC: THE BIBLE IN THE BEGINNING …, 174m.
10AM-Noon, FMC: HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON, 108m.
A John Huston double-header. First, Huston does the big book in the last film in the first cycle of widescreen Biblical epics. Huston directs, writes and stars as Noah, with George C. Scott as Abraham, Ava Gardner as Sarah, Richard Harris as Cain, Franco Nero as Abel, Peter O'Toole as the Three Angels and Gabriele Ferzetti as Lot. ALLISON teams Huston and Robert Mitchum for a WWII yarn about a Marine and a Roman Catholic nun [Deborah Kerr] being marooned on an island in the South Pacific. John Boorman later remade this elliptical romance as HELL IN THE PACIFIC with Lee Marvin and Toshiro Mifune, which I'm going to keep claiming until either someone calls me on it or it gets added to both films' Wikipedia entries.

10:15AM-Noon, Sun: HOMETOWN BAGHDAD, 97m.
A collection of the short short Web diaries of three Iraqi youths make for a slice of life in wartime. [Reairs at 3:05PM.]

11:30AM-1:30PM, TCM: ALL FALL DOWN, 110m.
1:30PM-4PM, TCM: BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ, 149m.
A pair of 1962-released films from John Frankenheimer; DOWN is a romance starring young Warren Beatty, Eva Marie Saint and Angela Lansbury. BIRDMAN is the Robert Stroud biopic that starred Burt Lancaster, with Telly Savalas and Thelma Ritter.

Noon-1:35PM, IFC: WORDPLAY, 94m.
Patrick Creadon's examination of the noble crossword puzzle, its history, production and fan culture. Features interviews with Will Shortz, Bob Dole, Ken Burns and Jon Stewart.

4PM-6PM TCM: THE CINCINNATI KID,103m.
A poker version of THE HUSTLER, only Steve McQueen and Edward G. Robinson try to steal scenes by underacting. Ann-Margret co-stars, Norman Jewison directs.

4:45PM-5PM, Sun: NEW BOY, 11m.
A short film from Steph Green and Roddy Doyle about a 9-year-old African boy's first day at an Irish school. [Reairs on March 28 at 5:35PM.]

6PM-8PM, TCM: MURDERERS' ROW, 105m.
The human race lost untold riches and glory when it somehow reached 1970 without a Matt Helm-Derek Flint team-up movie; if memory serves, the closest Dean Martin and James Coburn ever came to sharing the screen together was maybe a Western or a TV roast. This slice of Helm cheese co-stars Ann-Margret and Karl Malden, under the direction of Henry Levin.

8PM-9:30PM, IFC: MONTY PYTHON LIVE AT THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL, 77m.
[Reairs at 3AM.]
Concert film of the Pythons' last [I presume] live performance with the full troupe: Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, with Carol Cleveland and Neil Inness. A last hurrah before Chapman had to be an asshole and die on them.

8PM-10PM TCM: THE BIG SLEEP, 114m.
10PM-11:45PM, TCM: THE MALTESE FALCON, 101m.
Sometimes schedule programming this lazy deeply offends me.

11PM-12:20AM, Sun: A WALK INTO THE SEA: DANNY WILLIAMS AND THE WARHOL FACTORY, 77m.
Whatever happened to Danny Williams? Well, first: Who is Danny Williams? He was a key member of the filmmaking section of Andy Warhol's factory, who reportedly "edited some of Warhol's films and created the revolutionary lighting design for a notable stage show. Additionally, Williams was also Warhol's sometime lover." Williams' niece Esther B. Robinson made this documentary to investigate her uncle's life, work and 1966 disappearance. [Reairs at 4:50AM and 12:15PM.]


And, there's another week.