Stop me if you've heard this before

John Houseman, as described in Simon Callow's THE ROAD TO XANADU:

[Quoting Houseman, who said his mother] 'believed she was giving me the best of all possible lives. It didn't work out that way ... divided between my two worlds, I belonged to neither.'

...

No existing group seemed to have a a place for him, with his inflated reputation and diminished sense of identity. What he needed was a sense of purpose and a channel for his own unrealized gifts. He had reached an absolute impasse -- a writer lacking the courage to write, a director terrified of entering the rehearsal room ....

...

[In his memoirs, Houseman] observes with a novelist's eye, he dramatizes with a playwright's skill and analyses with a psychologist's precision, sparing neither himself nor anyone else.

...

Self-knowledge is, above all else, what differentiates him from Welles. On the other hand, spontaneity is is not his chief quality. He observes, others and himself, with hawk-like eye; but it is almost impossible for him to surrender to impulse without pre-meditation. In Satre's famous phrase about Baudelaire, he is a man without immediacy ....


No wonder I'm so gay for Orson Welles.

1 comment:

Mattew said...

That's definitely a favorite section of mine.